Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Why Live in Dallas?

Dallas combines big-city vibe and small-town feel, a combination that lends it a special atmosphere and makes it one of the most livable metropolises in the US. Cowboy life and friendly, closely-knit, suburban communities here coexists harmoniously with cosmopolitan offerings.

Whether you are looking for quiet life or for the sophistication of the big city, you will surely find it in Dallas. This complexity, combined with the excellent job opportunities offered by the city is attracting lots of newcomers to the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area, which also makes the real estate market of the area one of the hottest in the nation. Home prices and rental rates have been climbing steadily for the last few years, but they are still under the national average. Average income being somewhat higher than the average, locals and newcomers who find employment in Dallas can afford the type of housing they like.  You can find a well known Dallas roofing company and be employed right away if you are skilled.

Dallas also has a varied cultural life and its clubbing scene is also very exciting. Museums, such as the Perot Museum of Nature or the Dallas Museum of Art, theaters and cinemas are all there to provide high-quality entertainment and sports enthusiasts will also find a lot to do and to see – the city’s large stadium can accommodate around 80,000 fans and the excellent weather in the region invites locals to wander around.

First Seen right here: Why Live in Dallas?

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Dallas Demographics – the Composition of the Population

With its population of over 1,240,000 and a population density of over 3,600 people per square mile Dallas is a huge, bustling and diverse metropolis and also a young city, with only 8.6% of the population aged over 65. The city’s young and dynamically developing population is highly educated as well – over 74% of the locals are high-school graduates and over 30% have a college degree.

Dallas is an exciting and cosmopolitan city, with many different nationalities living peacefully here, each of them adding their own contributions to the city’s diversity. Hispanic and Latino people make up over 40% of the city’s populations and there is also a large community of Asian people, including Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese and Japanese communities. Around one quarter of the population is African American and there is a significant American Indian community as well.

Dallas is also one of the fastest growing cities in the nation – if the current trend of growth continues, Dallas will have one million more inhabitants by 2020. The principle factor that motivates such quick-paced growth is economic development – many major global corporations have moved to the Dallas-Fort Worth area and have created jobs in all industries present in the area, which includes some of the best in Dallas roofing industry as well.

Originally Posted on: Dallas Demographics – the Composition of the Population

Friday, August 25, 2017

Think you have a leaking roof? Find out what is causing it with this advice


Leaking roofs can start as small problems and can become very large ones quickly. As a homeowner, you want to investigate this problem as soon as you notice any signs of a leak. We encourage everyone to stay safe and to call a Dallas roofer for tasks that may require a professional. Below you will learn more about how to determine where the leak may be coming from.

Help! How to Determine What Is Causing a Roof Leak

Find and Fix Your Roof Leak

Roof leaks present multiple challenges for homeowners. They never occur at a time which is convenient and they can lead to significant damage to the interior of your home. Their effects can linger long after the repair has been made in the form of mold growth on the interior surfaces of your home.

Sometimes determining the source of the roof leak can be an even greater challenge. The source of the roof leak on the outside of the home rarely matches where the leak appears on the inside of the home.

This leads to a good deal of frustration for the homeowner who is attempting to repair the leak.

Locating the source of a roof leak is not an exact science. It is a process of elimination due to the fact that a roof leak may have several contributing factors and may not always be the direct result of one specific problem associated with your roof.

What Are the Ideal Conditions for Roof Leak Investigation?

  • It's best if you can see the leak as it occurs. In order to trace a leak back to its original source, it helps to visually see the active leak instead of depending on the remnants of the leak such as staining on the ceiling. Stains can be used to locate roof leaks, but they may not reveal the entire story behind the roof leak.
  • In order to see the leak occurring it will be necessary to trace the leak during a rain or snow event. If this is not possible, it may be necessary to conduct a water test on the roof surface by saturating the suspected area with a garden hose for a period of time until the leak occurs on the inside of the home.

How to Locate the Source of a Roof Leak

  1. Begin by locating the leak on the inside of the home. Confirm that the source of the water on the inside of the home is a result of a roof leak and not due to a problem associated with other components of the home. Other sources of potential leaks in the home include plumbing, roof scuppers, roof drains, HVAC, and condensation.
  2. Once you have determined that the leak is caused by a roof related issue, measure the location of the leak in the living space from two fixed points. These fixed points can be perpendicular exterior walls, a fireplace chimney or other components that extend through the finished ceiling to the attic space or roof surface.
  3. Go into your attic and locate the source of the leak on the underside of the roof deck using the measurements taken from your home’s living space. Review the active leak and note the surface where the leak is dripping from. The location of the actual entry point of the water into the attic space may be slightly different than where the leak is showing on the interior of the home so you may need to expand your search area once you are in the attic.
  4. Measure the location of where the water is entering the attic space from two fixed points. Look for fixed points such as vent pipes for bathrooms, chimneys, or vents. If these roof penetrations are not available, base your measurements on two perpendicular exterior walls.
  5. Safely gain access to your roof and apply the measurements taken from the attic space to the roof surface. You will need to adjust your measurements to take into account the depth of the exterior bearing walls and soffit overhangs if your measurements were based on the location of exterior walls.
  6. Locate the approximate location where the water is entering your attic space. Begin to work outward in concentric circles from the location where you determined the leak is occurring. As you review the roof remember that any opening in the roof system is an opportunity for water to enter your home. If the roofing materials show any openings where water can penetrate your home’s building envelope, this will result in a roof leak.

Read the full article here: How Do to Determine What Is Causing a Roof Leak http://bit.ly/2gbivDy


First Posted on: Think you have a leaking roof? Find out what is causing it with this advice

Friday, August 18, 2017

Learn how Your Roof Pitch Determines Your Roofing Material


Starting a roofing project can be overwhelming. Knowing as much as you can about different elements of the project can help you feel more confident while the project is going on. Starting the conversation knowing a bit about a roof pitch will impress your Dallas roofing company during your first meeting. Read below to learn more. 

How Roof Pitch Determines Your Choice Of Roofing Materials

When choosing roofing materials, it may seem that you have an infinite choice of any material on the market:  asphalt, composite, metal, wood shake, rubber, MSR rooled roofing. The world of roofing materials is your oyster, right?

Not so.  Many factors determine which roofing materials you can use.  One make-or-break factor is roof pitch.  

For example, you may think you want classic composite shingles on your roof, but if your pitch is below a certain ratio, you may be forced to install a different type of roofing--perhaps torch-down or standing seam metal roofing.

Roof Pitch Defined and Explained

Pitch is the term for the angle, slope, or slant, of your roof.  

Roof pitch designations are two numbers divided by a slash, such as 2/12 or 7/12.  A colon can replace the slash, as in 2:12 or 7:12.  The meaning is the same--ratio.

Numerator:  The numerator, or first number, refers to the vertical (height).  

Denominator:  The denominator, or second number, denotes the horizontal (length).  To make things a bit easier, for roofing purposes the denominator will always be 12.  Even though basic mathematics tells us that 12/12 can be reduced to 1/1, this is not done with roof pitch.  The denominator remains 12.

How To Calculate Pitch

Examples:

  • 5/12:  For every 12 horizontal feet, the roof drops 5 feet.  Another way to look at it is that for every 12 feet you go horizontally, the roof rises 5 feet.  Either way, this is the same thing.
  • 8/12:  For every 12 horizontal feet, the roof drops 8 feet.  Or you may prefer to look at it this way:  for every 8 vertical feet, the roof has 12 horizontal feet.

Average roof pitches will be in the range of 4/12 up to 8/12.  Examples of extreme slopes range from 1/4 / 12 (almost flat) to 12/12 (sloping down at a perfect 45 degree angle).

4/12 to 12/12 Pitch:  Asphalt and Composite

Asphalt shingles or composite shingles are the most popular kind of shingle and are the most serviceable type of shingle in terms of roof pitch.

These shingles can start as low as 4/12 pitch, going all the way up to a 12/12 pitch.  Think of them as taking the middle road in terms of roof pitch--not too flat, not too pitched.

5/12 to 12/12 Pitch:  Wood Shake and Slate

Wood shake and slate shingles are more susceptible to leakage than composite or asphalt, because the shingles do not lock together as tightly or lay as flat those other types of shingles.

Shake and slate shingles are good for pitches from 5/12 on up to 12/12.

Finally, note that these are common types of roofing materials and pitches; we have not covered all types. Also, these designations are not mutually exclusive. For instance, a torch-down roof, while commonly used for extremely low-pitched roofs, can also be used for steeper pitches, if so desired.

Read the full article here: How Roof Pitch Determines Your Choice Of Roofing Materials http://bit.ly/2whvKZX


Originally Posted right here: Learn how Your Roof Pitch Determines Your Roofing Material

Friday, August 11, 2017

Understand Roofing Terms Today!


Now, you have a roofing problem. You know you need a Dallas roofing contractor, but where do you begin? Once you explain your problem you will be told a solution you may not completely understand. Roofing involves a lot of industry terminology, and we want you to be able to understand it all! 

Talk Like a Roofer! Roofing Terms, Explained

Make sure you really understand what your roofing contractor is talking about before you make a major investment.

Need a new roof? Get ready to hear a lot of unfamiliar roofing terms. Let’s make sure you really understand what your roofing contractor is talking about before you make a major investment. 

Roofing Styles: Hip, Gable and Shed

What has slopes on four sides and keeps the rain out of your attic? A hip roof. Dead giveaways of a hip roof include:

  • Slopes on all four sides
  • All sides are equal length
  • A ridge at the top

Hip roofs are nice in snowy or windy environments — that winter snow will slide right off. If you’re interested in vaulted ceilings or a spacious attic, look for a house with a hip roof.

gable roof, on the other hand, is triangle-shaped, lacking those four even sides. A shed roofrefers to a roof that slopes in a single direction, flat and down, like you’d expect to see on, well, a shed.

Hip and gable are the two most common roof styles, but a single house can sometimes have multiple styles at the same time: you may have a gable roof with shed-style dormers, for example.

What’s a dormer? Good question!  Dormers are “a roofed structure that projects vertically beyond the plane of a pitched roof.” You’ll often see dormers jutting out over windows.

Understanding slope and pitch

People sometimes talk about a roof’s slope and pitch like they are the same thing. They’re not! Here’s the differences:

SLOPE: The slope is the angle of incline, usually expressed as a fraction or ratio. This fraction represents the number of inches that a vertical rise increases over a horizontal run. The rise, by the way, is the number of inches within one foot of run.

A roof with a slope of 6:12 is steeper than a roof with a slope of 4:12. Gable roofs often have steeper slopes than hip-style roofs.

PITCH: Pitch is the incline of the roof and is determined by dividing the rise of the roof by the span from one wall to another. Usually expressed as a fraction, pitch is less precise, but still allows you to understand the steepness of your roof. Very steep or low-sloping roofs are going to require special considerations when you replace them.

Decking, Eaves, Ridges, Valleys

All roofs have a deck, eaves and ridges. Most roofs have valleys, too.

Decking is the exactly what it sounds like: the foundation of your roof. The deck base rests against the your attic, covers the rafters and supports the weight of the roofing materials. The deck is usually made out of plywood or a composite.

Eaves are the edges of the roof that jut out over the walls of your home. Most eaves house intake vents for attic ventilation. Did you know your attic needs to be vented? This helps keep your attic from getting too warm, which can cause all sorts of moisture issues for your roofing materials or melt off snow too rapidly in the winter, which may cause ice dams in your gutters.

Gutters — you probably know what these are! — are placed at the edges of eaves to help push water running off of the roof away from the house. If water were to splash straight down to the ground, the moisture would eventually compromise the foundation of your home, setting up a scenario that can cause a lot of serious problems.

Ridges are the highest points on the roof. It’s where two roof lines intersect. Special shingles are used at roof ridges. Ridge vents should be installed at ridges to allow hot air to escape attic spaces.

Roof valleys are formed where two section of a roof come together. These intersections are one of the first places where water will penetrate in a failing roof. Installing special underlayment and flashing materials in these roof valleys is a smart move because these can be trouble spots.

Underlayment, Shingles, Flashing

So we’ve established what the deck of your roof will be: plywood or a composite like OSB that is attached to the bones of your attic.

Underlayment
comes next. It’s the base layer of asphalt and a mat of fiberglass or felt between the roof deck and the shingles. Underlayment can be water-resistant or waterproof, depending on what you purchase.

While you may never see your home’s underlayment, you see the shingles every day. Roofing shingles block UV rays from the sun, prevent water from leaking into your attic and provide aesthetic value to your home.

Eighty percent of American homes have asphalt shingle on their roofs. Why? Because asphalt shingles are affordable, versatile and look good. Other shingle materials include wood, metal and ceramic — and the prices can be a lot higher.

Flashing is a corrosion-resistant metal strip that is installed at roof edges and seams, These are the places where water is most likely to penetrate through the asphalt shingles and/or underlayment. Flashing helps direct water away from these trouble spots and gets it into the gutters. Water, when given the opportunity, will find cracks, so it needs to be redirected and eliminated as quickly as possible.

Read the full article here: Talk Like a Roofer! Roofing Terms, Explained - Porch Advice http://bit.ly/2lLtPTO


First Seen here: Understand Roofing Terms Today!

Be able to talk like a roofer – Learn the terminology!


Now, you have a roofing problem. You know you need a Dallas roofing contractor, but where do you begin? Once you explain your problem you will be told a solution you may not completely understand. Roofing involves a lot of industry terminology, and we want you to be able to understand it all! 

Talk Like a Roofer! Roofing Terms, Explained

Make sure you really understand what your roofing contractor is talking about before you make a major investment.

Need a new roof? Get ready to hear a lot of unfamiliar roofing terms. Let’s make sure you really understand what your roofing contractor is talking about before you make a major investment. 

Roofing Styles: Hip, Gable and Shed

What has slopes on four sides and keeps the rain out of your attic? A hip roof. Dead giveaways of a hip roof include:

  • Slopes on all four sides
  • All sides are equal length
  • A ridge at the top

Hip roofs are nice in snowy or windy environments — that winter snow will slide right off. If you’re interested in vaulted ceilings or a spacious attic, look for a house with a hip roof.

gable roof, on the other hand, is triangle-shaped, lacking those four even sides. A shed roofrefers to a roof that slopes in a single direction, flat and down, like you’d expect to see on, well, a shed.

Hip and gable are the two most common roof styles, but a single house can sometimes have multiple styles at the same time: you may have a gable roof with shed-style dormers, for example.

What’s a dormer? Good question!  Dormers are “a roofed structure that projects vertically beyond the plane of a pitched roof.” You’ll often see dormers jutting out over windows.

Understanding slope and pitch

People sometimes talk about a roof’s slope and pitch like they are the same thing. They’re not! Here’s the differences:

SLOPE: The slope is the angle of incline, usually expressed as a fraction or ratio. This fraction represents the number of inches that a vertical rise increases over a horizontal run. The rise, by the way, is the number of inches within one foot of run.

A roof with a slope of 6:12 is steeper than a roof with a slope of 4:12. Gable roofs often have steeper slopes than hip-style roofs.

PITCH: Pitch is the incline of the roof and is determined by dividing the rise of the roof by the span from one wall to another. Usually expressed as a fraction, pitch is less precise, but still allows you to understand the steepness of your roof. Very steep or low-sloping roofs are going to require special considerations when you replace them.

Decking, Eaves, Ridges, Valleys

All roofs have a deck, eaves and ridges. Most roofs have valleys, too.

Decking is the exactly what it sounds like: the foundation of your roof. The deck base rests against the your attic, covers the rafters and supports the weight of the roofing materials. The deck is usually made out of plywood or a composite.

Eaves are the edges of the roof that jut out over the walls of your home. Most eaves house intake vents for attic ventilation. Did you know your attic needs to be vented? This helps keep your attic from getting too warm, which can cause all sorts of moisture issues for your roofing materials or melt off snow too rapidly in the winter, which may cause ice dams in your gutters.

Gutters — you probably know what these are! — are placed at the edges of eaves to help push water running off of the roof away from the house. If water were to splash straight down to the ground, the moisture would eventually compromise the foundation of your home, setting up a scenario that can cause a lot of serious problems.

Ridges are the highest points on the roof. It’s where two roof lines intersect. Special shingles are used at roof ridges. Ridge vents should be installed at ridges to allow hot air to escape attic spaces.

Roof valleys are formed where two section of a roof come together. These intersections are one of the first places where water will penetrate in a failing roof. Installing special underlayment and flashing materials in these roof valleys is a smart move because these can be trouble spots.

Underlayment, Shingles, Flashing

So we’ve established what the deck of your roof will be: plywood or a composite like OSB that is attached to the bones of your attic.

Underlayment
comes next. It’s the base layer of asphalt and a mat of fiberglass or felt between the roof deck and the shingles. Underlayment can be water-resistant or waterproof, depending on what you purchase.

While you may never see your home’s underlayment, you see the shingles every day. Roofing shingles block UV rays from the sun, prevent water from leaking into your attic and provide aesthetic value to your home.

Eighty percent of American homes have asphalt shingle on their roofs. Why? Because asphalt shingles are affordable, versatile and look good. Other shingle materials include wood, metal and ceramic — and the prices can be a lot higher.

Flashing is a corrosion-resistant metal strip that is installed at roof edges and seams, These are the places where water is most likely to penetrate through the asphalt shingles and/or underlayment. Flashing helps direct water away from these trouble spots and gets it into the gutters. Water, when given the opportunity, will find cracks, so it needs to be redirected and eliminated as quickly as possible.

Read the full article here: Talk Like a Roofer! Roofing Terms, Explained - Porch Advice http://bit.ly/2lLtPTO


First Posted over here: Be able to talk like a roofer – Learn the terminology!